Intellectual Property



Intellectual property law protects the creative works of authors, composers, designers, and inventors from being pirated. There are four basic categories of intellectual property: copyrights, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets. Generally, each category is used with different types of material and affords different protections. Copyrights protect original works of authorship from the moment they are created and fixed in a tangible form. Patents protect new and useful machines, articles, substances, or processes through exclusive rights granted by the federal government to their inventors. Trademarks protect identifying marks that distinguish goods or services, such as names, logos, designs, emblems, and distinctive sounds and smells. Trade secrets protect confidential business information or "proprietary information," such as business plans, chemical formulas, and customer lists.

Find an Intellectual Property attorney in your area.


Select from The Following Topics
 
Do-it-Yourself Legal Forms
-  Copyright Registration-  Trademark Cease and Desist
-  Provisional Patent Application-  Trademark Registration
-  Release and Authorization to Use Voice and/or Likeness
 
Legal articles focusing on Intellectual Property Law
Protect Your Business' Intellectual Property
Intellectual property isn't tangible. Although it's not typically something that you can hold in your hands, it belongs to your business just the same. It's as real as any piece of equipment. A variety of laws protect it against theft by other businesses or individuals.
The Patent Process
Patents give inventors the exclusive right to use, make, and sell their inventions, such as new machines and processes. During National Inventors Month, it's a good time to learn how you can protect your ideas for a new product or machine through the patent process.
Licensing Agreements
In business, a written license agreement is essential to enforce your rights. A license is really nothing more than a contractual right that gives someone permission to do a certain activity or to use certain property that is owned by someone else.
Intellectual Property: Selecting a Good Lawyer
Entertainment and intellectual property law cover a very broad spectrum of legal issues involving contracts, patents, trademarks, copyrights and more. The level of expertise of lawyers specializing in these areas can vary from generalists in the field to experts in sub-specialties that may range fro

Ask a Lawyer - Intellectual Property Law questions answered by leading lawyers
Online store named similar to a popular movie?
For example... If the movie is called: Finding Nemo.... Could I legally name an online web store that sells high end goods: Finding Supremo? What if I use the same/similar font style, but maybe in different colors VS using a completely new style/font...? Thanks for your help.
Will we get sued by another website if our idea is similar
My partner and I are starting a website that does something similar to what another website does but caters to a different niche and different clientele. However, our domain name is similar. They do a website AND a publication, we are only focusing on the website. We aren't using anything from their site. What grounds would they have to take action against us? Could they take action against us?
I was contacted by the BBC and they want to license my video on Jeff Koons, Talking Heads Conversati
I am a Disabled Veteran and do not know how to draft up a license contract or what fee to charge.
Ip question , who is right in this case and why ?
Company A and Company B entered into a license agreement, having the following provision. Company A hereby covenants not to sue Company B for infringement based upon any act by Company B of manufacture, use, sale, offer for sale, or import of the Licensed Product that occurs after the effective date of this Agreement. The covenants will apply only to patents that claim such Licensed Product. The covenants will not apply to patents that claim an apparatus or method for making or using the Licensed Product. It turned out that Company A owned Patent X that claims such Licensed Product and Patent Y that claims a method for making such Licensed Product. Company A's position is that the covenants under the agreement applies only to Patent X that claims such Licensed Product. Company B's position is that the covenants applies to Patent Y as well. According to Company A's position, Company B cannot use the method as claimed in Patent Y without acquiring a further permission
About importing counterfeit goods?
Hello. I recently bought 50 jerseys from China. I paid 20 dollars each jersey. Jerseys are coming in two packages, 20-30 jerseys each package. I am scared because yesterday my cousing told me Aliexpress web page sells counterfeit goods. Is the first time ever i import goods from any country in the whole world. I am worried of being acused of importing counterfeit goods. I really didnt know, and dont know yet if those jerseys are fake or not. What could happen? is customs going to seize my jerseys? Is US government going to make me go to jail? Or US government is going to make me pay a fine? Thanks for your time.
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Intellectual Property Lawyer Web Sites
 
 -  New York Law - Sepe & O'mahony, PLLC
 -  Maui County Law - Tateishi & Pascual, Attorneys A Law Corporation
 -  Santa Barbara Lawsuit - Crane Flores, LLP Attorneys At Law
 -  Salem Attorneys - Harris, Wyatt & Amala, LLC
 -  Tampa Litigation - Westchase Law P.A.
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